Magnificent Magnesium. Can it Reduce Pain

Discover the Many Health Benefits of Magnesium

Magnesium is a mineral found in healthy foods like nuts, whole grains and dark leafy vegetables. Magnesium is responsible for over 300 enzymatic reactions and many physiological functions including muscular health and function.

While most of the body’s magnesium is found in bone, muscular tissue and soft tissues – it can also be found within cells where it stabilizes important enzymes that control functions like muscle contraction, glucose utilization and the synthesis of fat. Magnesium’s many body benefits are often overlooked, and the mineral is rarely mentioned as an essential nutrient.

Learn more about the power of magnesium, and how it has helped patients address pain and various medical conditions.

Are You Getting Enough Magnesium?

People often assume they consume enough magnesium through the foods they eat. Although magnesium is found in many healthy foods, your digestive tract doesn’t always fully absorb the magnesium you eat – especially if you have digestive problems. As a result, many
Americans have magnesium deficiencies.

Benefits of Magnesium

Scientific research shows that magnesium supplements are helpful in addressing medical conditions that have painful side effects. A study published by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition indicated that magnesium supplements could lower blood pressure in patients with mild to moderate blood pressure.

Studies show magnesium supplementation could provide chronic migraine relief. In a study published in Cephalagia: An International Journal of Headache, magnesium supplementation reduced migraine attack frequency by 41.6 percent. Patients in the study also reported fewer migraine days.

Magnesium supplements have also shown to be effective in addressing anxiety. Combined with other dietary supplements, a recent study concluded that magnesium had a significant effect on reducing anxiety-related symptoms like irritability, mood swings, general anxiety and nervous tension.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) has baffled the medical community for years, because the cause is not entirely clear. One study examined the relationship between CFS patients and low levels of magnesium in red blood cells – a common condition of CFS patients. The study found that by administering magnesium injections, those treated reported higher levels of energy, a better emotional state and less pain.


Researchers still have a long way to go to better understand the role of magnesium in treating medical conditions. While multiple studies have shown positive results, they do not provide definitive conclusions on the subject. Significant progress is being made to better understand the role magnesium plays and its therapeutic effects on a variety of medical conditions.

If you’re considering magnesium supplementation, or other forms of alternative medicine as a treatment plan, contact Dayton Dandes Medical Center today for a consultation.


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De souza MC, Walker AF, Robinson PA, Bolland K. A synergistic effect of a daily supplement for 1 month of 200 mg magnesium plus 50 mg vitamin B6 for the relief of anxiety-related premenstrual symptoms: a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. J Womens Health Gend Based Med. 2000;9(2):131-9.

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